International Mentored Scientist Award

Spring 2024 funding cycle: Applications closed, funding results available before end of May 2024

Fall 2024 funding cycle:

  • Call opens: Thursday, August 29, 2024
  • Deadline: Monday September 30, 2024 (2:00 pm PST)
  • Funding Results: available before end of December, 2024

Amount available: $30,000 in direct costs for 1 year

Apply through the UCSF Resource Allocation Program (RAP) portal

The International Mentored Scientist Award seeks to provide a mentored career development opportunity in HIV research for international investigators affiliated with UCSF. Applicants for this award must indicate a UCSF-affiliated faculty research mentor(s) in HIV who will commit to guiding the applicant for the application process and throughout the duration of the proposed project. Project proposals should be geared toward the interests of the applicant (e.g., clinical, basic, implementation science and/or behavioral-epidemiological research) and focus on HIV research in the investigator’s home country.

Eligibility
Researchers (all levels), post-doctoral fellows, and trainees located at a UCSF-affiliated foreign institution who have not received an NIH R01- equivalent grant in HIV/AIDS are eligible. Please note that CFAR is not allowed to provide funding to any investigators who have received HIV-related R01 awards. More senior faculty members may apply only if they are newly entering the field of HIV research.

Designation of Mentor (Critical)

Mentoring is critical to the training component of the CFAR International Mentored Scientist awards. All International Mentored award applications require a faculty research mentor from UCSF or a UCSF-affiliated institution (https://cfar.ucsf.edu/about/partners). Applications without a mentor will be disqualified.

Applicants must identify their UCSF-affiliated mentors and arrange to receive mentor advice and guidance on the research portion of their application well before it is submitted (typically at least two months before the RAP deadline). CFAR is no longer available to assist with mentor identification.

Projects must be within NIH’s HIV/AIDS research high or medium priority areas. Projects in closely related areas (e.g. TB, HCV, drug use, etc.) must be clearly linked to HIV in order to be eligible for CFAR funding.

The award amount is $30,000 in direct costs for one year.
For more detailed information about this RFA, please see the RAP Portal.

International Mentored Science Awardees

33 Awards

Award Recipient Award date Award Type
Prevalence and outcomes associated with SARS-COV-2 antibody seropositivity among persons at risk for tuberculosis in a high HIV-burden setting: a cohort study in Lusaka, Zambia Nsala Sanjase, MBChB Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Potential for Xpert MTB/RIF Ultra cycle threshold values to monitor early response to anti-TB treatment in HIV co-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy Juliet Namugenyi, MSc Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Prevalence, clinical and immunological predictors of frailty among older adults with HIV in Kampala Phoebe Mbabazi, MD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Adaptation of a Mindfulness based intervention to support Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among adolescents in Uganda Khamisi Musanje, M.A. Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Willingness and Feasibility of Using Injectable Antiretroviral Therapy among Women who Retained and Disengaged from Prevention of Mother to Child HIV Transmission Programs in Uganda Deborah Ekusai-Sebatta, PhD Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Changes in insulin kinetics in HIV infected patients diagnosed with dolutegravir associated diabetes in Uganda Frank Mulindwa, MD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Impact Evaluation of a Primary Care Health System Strengthening Intervention on HIV and TB services in Kono and Kailahun Districts, Sierra Leone Mohamed Bailor Barrie, MD, PhD (Cand) Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Evaluation of an African specific Donor Health Questionnaire for HIV screening in Cameroonian blood services Claude Tayou-Tagny MCR/MPH/MS, MD, MSC Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Investigating into the social, health and economic vulnerabilities and resilience of children of women at high risk of HIV in Kampala Agnes Ssali, PhD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C transactivator of transcription (Tat) P21A variant on nuclear levels of active positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) and viral latency Paradise Madlala, PhD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Exploring HIV care of highly mobile HIV-positive youth living in Kenya and Uganda: qualitative study to identify gaps in the HIV care cascade and evaluate feasible intervention options Irene Maeri , BA, MA Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Testing Medicinal Plants from Uganda for HIV Latency Reversing Activity Emmanuel Mande, Bsc Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Understanding factors that facilitate effective uptake and integration of health interventions in South African primary health care clinics van Heerden Alastair, PhD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Patients and peer navigators lived experiences and drivers for creating a successful personalized adaptive care relationship to treat lapses HIV treatment retention: a longitudinal qualitative study Zachary Kwena, PhD(c), MA Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Understanding the impact of an income generating agricultural intervention on sexual behaviour and psychological well being of adolescent girls and young women living in a high HIV urban setting in Western Kenya Mariacianah Onono, MD Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Development and Validation of an HPLC-UV Multiplex Assay for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antiretroviral Drugs in Uganda Allan Buzibye, Bsc Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Global gene array, secretome analyses, and HIV infection analyses of foreskin epithelial cells upon exposure to cervicovaginal fluid from healthy vs. women with bacterial vaginosis Grace Turyasingura, BSc Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
ComHealth: Cost-effective mHealth strategy to improve long-term retention in HIV care for mother-baby pairs Thomas Odeny, MBChB, MPH Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Evaluation of a point-of-care assay for the diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis in women at high risk for HIV infection Sheila Nabweyambo, BSc Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Feasibility of Screening and Brief Intervention for Hazardous Alcohol use amongst HIV-infected Adults in Uganda: A Qualitative Study Stephen Asiimwe, MMed, MBChB Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Impact of Neonatal Exposure to Malaria and HIV on the Frequency, Phenotype, and Function of __ T Cell Subsets at Birth Fredrick Lutwama, PhD, MDChb Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Promoting Positive Caregiver-Child Interaction Between HIV-Affected Children and Their Caregivers with Depression in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa Duncan Andrew, MA Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Investigation of Pediatric HIV Disclosure in Kampala, Uganda Monica Etima, MBChB, MMed Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Evaluation of the Dynamics and Immuno-Virology of Human Papillomavirus Infections among Fishermen in Kisumu, Kenya Raphael Ondondo, PhD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Development of a Combination HIV Prevention Intervention for Transgender Women in Peru Alfonso Silva-Santisteban, MD, MPH Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Mechanisms of CD4 T-cell death among HIV-infected, HAART-treated African adults displaying poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution despite effective viral suppression Damalie Nakanjako, MBChB, MMed, PhD Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
A study to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of providing integrated HIV and maternal and child health services thorough well child services in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa Christiane Horwood, MBBS Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Adaptation of a Male Partner Educational Intervention Tool for Vaginal Microbicide Trials Serah Wagikondi-Gitome, MBChB Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Optimizing Nevirapine Dosing in Patients Co-infected with Tuberculosis and HIV in Harare, Zimbabwe Luther Gwaza, PhD Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Examining Sexual Concurrency and Sexual Networks among Married Fishermen Couples in Kisumu District, Kenya Zachary Kwena, PhD(c), MA Fall International Mentored Scientist Award
Family Planning Use Among Female Clients Attending The HIV/AIDS Clinic In Mbarara University Teaching Hospital Winnie Muyindike, MBChB, MMed, DPAM Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Frequency and evolution of HIV-1 drug resistance among Ugandan children receiving antiretroviral therapy Jane Achan, MBChB, MMed, MSc Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Perioperative Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids: Incidence, Causes and Attitudes in Uganda Timothy Kimuli, MBChB, MMed Spring International Mentored Scientist Award
Contacts
  • Exploring HIV care of highly mobile HIV-positive youth living in Kenya and Uganda: qualitative study to identify gaps in the HIV care cascade and evaluate feasible intervention options

    Exploring HIV care of highly mobile HIV-positive youth living in Kenya and Uganda: qualitative study to identify gaps in the HIV care cascade and evaluate feasible intervention options

    Abstract

    In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) sub-optimal care engagement among youth living with HIV (YLWH) aged 15 – 24 years presents a challenge for the control of the HIV epidemic. Mobility is a chief contributor to the lags in the last two 90 of the 90-90-90 UNAIDS target in SSA- home to the largest intra-continental movement of people, largest youth population, and the highest burden of HIV/AIDS. The majority of YLWH in SSA access care within systems largely designed for adult and stable populations; service provision fails to meet their unique needs, leading to lapses in care and non-adherence.

  • Understanding factors that facilitate effective uptake and integration of health interventions in South African primary health care clinics

    Understanding factors that facilitate effective uptake and integration of health interventions in South African primary health care clinics

    Abstract

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been established as a highly successful HIV prevention tool and despite international calls to prioritize programs that will ensure HIV diagnosis, ART prescription, and viral suppression,1 only a small number of programs to improve ART uptake, retention in care, and adherence to medication have been successfully integrated into health systems.

  • Testing Medicinal Plants from Uganda for HIV Latency Reversing Activity

    Testing Medicinal Plants from Uganda for HIV Latency Reversing Activity

    Abstract

    Current antiviral regimens for HIV have been highly successful in limiting viral HIV replication and reducing viral loads to undetectable levels in most patients. However, these antiviral drug regimens do not cure the infection because HIV is able to establish a latent reservoir within memory CD4 cells that are not attacked by combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART).

  • Understanding the impact of an income generating agricultural intervention on sexual behaviour and psychological well being of adolescent girls and young women living in a high HIV urban setting in Western Kenya

    Understanding the impact of an income generating agricultural intervention on sexual behaviour and psychological well being of adolescent girls and young women living in a high HIV urban setting in Western Kenya

    Abstract

    Background: More than 40% of all new HIV infections are among adolescents and of these nearly two-thirds occur in adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) living in sub-Saharan Africa. Food insecurity, poverty and parental HIV/AIDS have been identified as important drivers of HIV risk and vulnerability among AGYW. Household level interventions that target poverty and food insecurity offer many advantages over individual centered approaches by reducing AGYW sexual risk taking and improving psychosocial wellbeing.

  • Patients and peer navigators lived experiences and drivers for creating a successful personalized adaptive care relationship to treat lapses HIV treatment retention: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Patients and peer navigators lived experiences and drivers for creating a successful personalized adaptive care relationship to treat lapses HIV treatment retention: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Headshot of

    Abstract

    Poor retention in HIV care programs is an obstacle in achieving the last two 90s in UNAIDS' 90-90-90 targets and end HIV by 2030. Peer support represents a potentially widely generalizable and cost effective strategy to enhance engagement in HIV care, but to date, a wide variety of peer-based interventions exist and the most effective specific use of peers is not well understood.

  • Development and Validation of an HPLC-UV Multiplex Assay for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antiretroviral Drugs in Uganda

    Development and Validation of an HPLC-UV Multiplex Assay for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antiretroviral Drugs in Uganda

    Abstract

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antiretroviral drugs has optimized treatment of HIV-infected patients in resource-rich countries especially in selected ‘difficult to treat’ situations (1). The measurement of drug levels in serum samples enables timely diagnosis of low drug levels, which put patients at risk of developing treatment failure, as well as too high levels which foster toxicity of the drugs.

  • ComHealth: Cost-effective mHealth strategy to improve long-term retention in HIV care for mother-baby pairs

    ComHealth: Cost-effective mHealth strategy to improve long-term retention in HIV care for mother-baby pairs

    Abstract

    There is an urgent global goal to eliminate new HIV infections among children by 2015 and to keep their mothers alive, with the targets of providing antiretroviral therapy to all HIV-infected pregnant women and children. Yet, barely a year away from the 2015 deadline, HIV programs are far from reaching these targets. A substantial proportion of HIV-positive pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa are lost to follow-up after delivery.

  • Global gene array, secretome analyses, and HIV infection analyses of foreskin epithelial cells upon exposure to cervicovaginal fluid from healthy vs. women with bacterial vaginosis

    Global gene array, secretome analyses, and HIV infection analyses of foreskin epithelial cells upon exposure to cervicovaginal fluid from healthy vs. women with bacterial vaginosis

    Abstract

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a disruption of the normal vaginal flora, has recently been associated with a greater than 3-fold increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission in a manner not accounted for by plasma HIV-1 RNA load(1). We hypothesize that compared to cervicovaginal fluid (CVF) from healthy individuals, BV CVF induces an elevated pro-inflammatory and pro-chemotactic response in cells of the foreskin which may facilitate transmission.

  • Evaluation of a point-of-care assay for the diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis in women at high risk for HIV infection

    Evaluation of a point-of-care assay for the diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis in women at high risk for HIV infection

    Abstract

    Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), is the most common, curable sexually transmitted infection worldwide with a particularly high prevalence of up to 35% among women in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This region of the world is also home to almost 70% of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occurring worldwide and most of these infections occur in women. Recent studies showed that TV infection in African women is associated with a 1.5 ? 2.7-fold increased risk for HIV infection.

  • Perioperative Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids: Incidence, Causes and Attitudes in Uganda

    Perioperative Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids: Incidence, Causes and Attitudes in Uganda

    Abstract

    Protection of operating theatre personnel from bloodborne pathogens has been neglected in Uganda. Nature, frequency, risk factors, and preventive measures for perioperative exposure of theatre personnel will be identified by conducting a 6 month cross-sectional study in Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Multiple logistic regression will analyze risk factors for exposure. Case exposure rate and cumulative risk of seroconversion of HIV will be calculated. Surveys of theatre personnel will assess knowledge, attitude, and practice for risks of perioperative bloodborne infections.