January CFAR Seminar: Steven Shoptaw, PhD

Methamphetamine and HIV: The Next Decade of HIV Prevention

Watch the livestream here!

Add to Calendar 2020-01-15 09:00 2020-01-15 09:00 America/Los_Angeles January CFAR Seminar: Steven Shoptaw, PhD

Watch the livestream here!

Dr. Shoptaw is Executive Director of the Center for Behavioral & Addiction Medicine (CBAM) and Center Director of the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services (CHIPTS). He is a licensed psychologist, Professor and Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Family Medicine and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA as well as an Honorary Professor at the University of Cape Town. For over 25 years, he has conducted Phase Ib and IIa randomized clinical trials of medications and behavioral interventions for individuals with stimulant use disorder. He conducts these clinical studies in community settings, striving to bring medical and behavioral interventions to treat addiction and to prevent the spread of HIV, especially in substance-using groups living with comorbidities and with inconsistent access to social determinants of health.

Carr Auditorium (ZSFG Building 3) , SF General Hospital and Trauma Center
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Dr. Shoptaw is Executive Director of the Center for Behavioral & Addiction Medicine (CBAM) and Center Director of the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services (CHIPTS). He is a licensed psychologist, Professor and Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Family Medicine and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA as well as an Honorary Professor at the University of Cape Town. For over 25 years, he has conducted Phase Ib and IIa randomized clinical trials of medications and behavioral interventions for individuals with stimulant use disorder. He conducts these clinical studies in community settings, striving to bring medical and behavioral interventions to treat addiction and to prevent the spread of HIV, especially in substance-using groups living with comorbidities and with inconsistent access to social determinants of health.