Grant Writer's Workshop at Gladstone

Add to Calendar 2020-03-10 2020-03-10 America/Los_Angeles Grant Writer's Workshop at Gladstone

CFAR and the Gladstone Institutes are offering an opportunity for CFAR mentees to participate in a 1-day grant writing workshop hosted at the Gladstone and organized by Grant Writers' Seminars and Workshops

This all-day presentation comprehensively addresses both practical and conceptual aspects important to writing competitive grant proposals. It is appropriate for faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and administrative staff who have had some exposure to writing grant applications, either through training / mentoring or personal experience. Each presentation is tailored to meet the needs of the audience, e.g., to focus on the funding agency of greatest interest to the attendees. Emphasis is given to doing the “extra” things that can make the difference between success and failure.

Participants are taught to write with a linear progression of logic, which leads reviewers through an application without them knowing that they are being led. Coping strategies to overcome the fact that applicants are writing for two different audiences – the assigned reviewers, who read the application in its entirety, and non-assigned reviewers who may have read little, or nothing, of the proposal before the meeting of the review panel – are emphasized.

Mahley Auditorium, Gladstone Institutes , Mission Bay

CFAR and the Gladstone Institutes are offering an opportunity for CFAR mentees to participate in a 1-day grant writing workshop hosted at the Gladstone and organized by Grant Writers' Seminars and Workshops

This all-day presentation comprehensively addresses both practical and conceptual aspects important to writing competitive grant proposals. It is appropriate for faculty members, postdoctoral researchers and administrative staff who have had some exposure to writing grant applications, either through training / mentoring or personal experience. Each presentation is tailored to meet the needs of the audience, e.g., to focus on the funding agency of greatest interest to the attendees. Emphasis is given to doing the “extra” things that can make the difference between success and failure.

Participants are taught to write with a linear progression of logic, which leads reviewers through an application without them knowing that they are being led. Coping strategies to overcome the fact that applicants are writing for two different audiences – the assigned reviewers, who read the application in its entirety, and non-assigned reviewers who may have read little, or nothing, of the proposal before the meeting of the review panel – are emphasized.