CAPS/PRC Town Hall presents: Morgan Philbin, PhD, Columbia University

Interrogating the promise of biomedical HIV technologies: Health disparities and the rollout of long-acting injectable ART and PrEP

Long-acting injectable ART and PrEP have the potential to transform HIV prevention and treatment. However, the scale-up of previous biomedical technologies has occurred in ways that often failed to reach the most marginalized individuals. This presentation will use in-depth interview data from 89 women across the MACS/WIHS cohort to highlight factors that can help facilitate the scale-up of long-acting injectable ART and PrEP in ways that maximize population health impact and reduce existing disparities. 

Morgan Philbin, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She is a social and behavioral scientist whose mixed methods research examines the social-structural drivers of HIV and substance use outcomes with a focus on racial/ethnic and sexual and gender minority youth. Her primary research project is a NIDA-funded K01 that explores how state-level policies impact substance use and sexual health outcomes among Black, Latinx and sexual and gender minority youth. She was recently awarded an R34 from NIMH that will develop a patient decision aid to help individuals work with their providers to choose between oral and long-acting injectable versions of ART. Dr. Philbin has conducted research on substance use and HIV in the United States, Mexico and China. She was recently awarded the 2021 NIH Office of Disease Prevention Early-Stage Investigator Lecture Award.

Session Chair:  John Sauceda, PhD, MS, Assistant Professor of Medicine, UCSF Division of Prevention Science

Add to Calendar 2021-09-14 11:00 2021-09-14 11:00 America/Los_Angeles CAPS/PRC Town Hall presents: Morgan Philbin, PhD, Columbia University

Long-acting injectable ART and PrEP have the potential to transform HIV prevention and treatment. However, the scale-up of previous biomedical technologies has occurred in ways that often failed to reach the most marginalized individuals. This presentation will use in-depth interview data from 89 women across the MACS/WIHS cohort to highlight factors that can help facilitate the scale-up of long-acting injectable ART and PrEP in ways that maximize population health impact and reduce existing disparities. 

Morgan Philbin, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She is a social and behavioral scientist whose mixed methods research examines the social-structural drivers of HIV and substance use outcomes with a focus on racial/ethnic and sexual and gender minority youth. Her primary research project is a NIDA-funded K01 that explores how state-level policies impact substance use and sexual health outcomes among Black, Latinx and sexual and gender minority youth. She was recently awarded an R34 from NIMH that will develop a patient decision aid to help individuals work with their providers to choose between oral and long-acting injectable versions of ART. Dr. Philbin has conducted research on substance use and HIV in the United States, Mexico and China. She was recently awarded the 2021 NIH Office of Disease Prevention Early-Stage Investigator Lecture Award.

Session Chair:  John Sauceda, PhD, MS, Assistant Professor of Medicine, UCSF Division of Prevention Science

Zoom Registration Link