The Intersection of Misogynoir: Obstetric Racism & HIV, a three-part series

Historical and contemporary context of Anti-Black gendered racism, misogynoir, and obstetric racism: frameworks, theories, and concepts in relation to HIV-related stigma and patient health care experiences

Add to Calendar 2021-11-12 09:30 2021-11-12 09:30 America/Los_Angeles The Intersection of Misogynoir: Obstetric Racism & HIV, a three-part series

Description

The Pacific AIDS Education & Training Center, HIVE, and the National Clinician Consultation Center, invite you to attend this three-part series.

The Intersection of Misogynoir: Obstetric Racism & HIV, a three-part series 
Speaker: Dr. Karen A. Scott, MD, MPH, FACOG
 
Session #1: Historical and contemporary context of Anti-Black gendered racism, misogynoir, and obstetric racism: frameworks, theories, and concepts in relation to HIV-related stigma and patient health care experiences
November 12, 2021 @ 9:30am-11am 
  
Participation in all three parts of the series is highly encouraged. Please register for the other two parts in the series:

Session #2: Structural analysis of power and access to care using a Black feminist praxis: Misogynoir, obstetric racism, and service provision for HIV patient populations, evaluation, and training
December 3, 2021 @ 9:30am-11am 
Click HERE to Register for Session #2
 
Session #3: Participatory Action Research: Knowledge construction, patient voice, community leadership and reciprocity. Carcerality and Criminalization of Pregnancy and Living with HIV 
January 7, [email protected] @ 9:30am-11am 
Click HERE to Register for Session #3

Learning Objectives: At the end of the training series, the participants will be able to:

  • Define and describe anti-Black racism, misogynoir, obstetric racism, and HIV-related stigma
  • Explain how anti-Black racism, misogynoir, and HIV-related stigma shape health care expectations and experiences of Black women and people living with HIV with capacity for any pregnancy-related experience, focusing on labor, vaginal birth, abdominal birth and post-operative care, postpartum, lactation, and infant feeding
  • Summarize the impact of obstetric racism on patient-centered access to health care
  • Describe strategies to diagnose and disrupt obstetric racism and HIV-related stigma at the health systems level to improve the impact of care on patient and community experiences

Background: Black women are disproportionately impacted by HIV, accounting for nearly 60% of new HIV infections in US women, despite making up less than 15% of the female population. Black women also experience the greatest burden of severe maternal mortality. Black women living with HIV who are pregnant, birthing, and postpartum are likely to experience anti-Black gendered racism, misogynoir, and HIV-related stigma throughout their interactions with the healthcare system. Misogynoir was defined by Black woman scholar Dr. Moya Bailey in 2010 as the co-constitutive, anti-Black, and misogynistic racism directed at Black women, particularly in visual and digital culture (Bailey, 2010). “The term is a combination of misogyny, the hatred of women, and noir, which means black but also carries film and media connotations. It is the particular amalgamation of anti-Black racism and misogyny in popular media and culture that targets Black trans and cis women."

Purpose: The primary aim of the three-part training is to build capacity for diagnosing and dismantling obstetric racism across power relations, differentials, and dynamics in health systems serving and supporting Black women, mothers, and people living with HIV. The first part of the training will introduce the history, theories, and concepts of anti-Black gendered racism, misogynoir, and obstetric racism. The second and third parts will dig deeper into how obstetric racism intersects with misogynoir and HIV stigma during service provision, training, and evaluation in healthcare settings.

Audience: This three-part series is for people involved in service provision, training, and evaluation impacting Black women and people living with HIV who experience pregnancy, miscarriage, abortion, labor, vaginal birth, abdominal birth and postoperative care, postpartum, lactation, and infant feeding.

This series is a collaboration among the Pacific AIDS Education and Training Center, HIVE, and the National Clinician Consultation Center.